World War II

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Selective Service Board

Baldwin, I.A. Madison
Dahl, M.O. Nunda
Hoidal, Iver Madison
Drake, M.G. Madison
Kelley, Ross B. Madison
Loehr, Frank B. Madison
Oldre, G.M. Madison
Tuor, Frank Madison
Wood, R.B. Winfred

Examining Physicians and Dentists

Braskamp, H.H. Madison
Brown, Milo G. Madison
Sherwood, Clarence E. Madison
Westaby, J.R. Madison

Government Appeal Agent

Holdridge, H.H. Madison

Reemployment Committeeman

Arneson, William R. Madison

Advisory Board for Registrants

Arneson, William R. Madison
Farmer, Walter H. Madison
Lammers, J.H. Madison
Quist, Andrew Madison
Sponholz, A.W. Madison
Urdahl, Hans Madison
Westby, Ernest M. Madison

History of Company A of the 109th Engineer Regiment of the South Dakota National Guard During World War II

The 109th Engineer Regiment was formed after World War I by Colonel Earle L. Lewis. Lewis, a South Dakota School of Mines graduate, was a veteran of the Mexican Border Conflict and World War I. In 1924, after a full regiment was completed, the 109th was federally recognized as a National Guard unit.

Colonel Lewis was still in charge when the 109th was activated on February 10, 1941. On September 17 1941, Col. Lewis suffered a stroke during maneuvers at Camp Claibourne, Louisiana and died four days later.

At Camp Claibourne, the unit built bridges and firing ranges, underwent arms and explosive training, suffered through KP, guard duty, and cooking that definitely wasn't like Mom's, and conducted snake hunts in their spare time.

On a very cold January 2, 1942, the 109th Engineer Regiment left Camp Claibourne by train to travel to Fort Dix, NJ prior to deployment overseas. Because of the length of the train, heat was unable to travel the full length. The ensuing frozen pipes made frequent stops for thawing them necessary.

The weather in New Jersey, four degrees below zero, was no warmer on the regiment's arrival on January 5, earlier than expected. Officers bedded down on the tables and floor of a mess hall. Rank-and-file soldiers drew cots in tents, where fires were started. (One tent burnt down.)

Nine days later, Company A left for New York to embark on the Chateau Thierry the next day as part of the advance contingent of the 34th Division, to which the regiment was now attached.

Warmly welcomed in Northern Ireland, Company A, and the rest of the 109th, now a battalion, were conducted to Camp Killadeas, which had been built by the U.S. Navy. In Ireland, the 109th underwent more training and aided in the construction of roads, ranges, and a hospital. Many enlisted men and officers also received further training at the British engineering school at Ripon.

While in Ireland, personnel shifts were common; men from Company A were transferred elsewhere and new men were rotated in from other units. It was also in Ireland that Co. A had its first fatality. Private First Class James G. Pardy, Jr., a 21-year-old Madison resident, was killed when his motorcycle ran into the back of a tractor on September 13, 1942.

After crossing the Irish Sea earlier in December, 1942, Company A and the rest of the 109th embarked on the Orientes and left Liverpool on Christmas Day. After much speculation on their destination, they passed through the Straits of Gibralter the night of January 1, 1943. They landed in Oran where they witnessed a troop ship rammed by a freighter on January 4. Welcome to Africa.

At first, the 34th "Red Bull" Division, of which the 109th was now a part, was unopposed and started a sweep eastward. They even had time to enjoy fruit from the famous orange groves of Tiemcin.

Farther east, near Makter, the 109th was strafed by enemy airplanes but narrow, treacherous roads, further blocked by obsolete and abandoned French and British equipment, were bigger obstacles.

Unfortunately, the war in Africa soon turned against the Allies. Advancing German panzers forced a retreat of Allied troops in Tunisia. During this rout, a significant number of South Dakotans, most from the 109th but then on duty with the 168th Infantry Combat Team, were captured at the Kasserine Pass. Lieutenant Royal E. Lee, from Madison and originally with Company A, was the platoon commander and captured with many of his men on February 16, 1943. Company A's Ray Ellison reported, "Only a few truck drivers got out of that one," then added, "Later we found the equipment the men had buried so the Germans couldn't get it." The captured men were eventually sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Germany. Lee was not freed until October, 1945.

During the turmoil that followed, the 109th repaired and built roads, cleared enemy mines, and laid mines of their own. At first, Company A's duty was to maintain the main supply route. Soon, most of them were given the duty of laying mines.

It was near Hajeb-el-Aioun on March 30, 1943, that South Dakota troops suffered their worst single experience. The chronicle of the 109th Engineer Battalion records it thus:

"March 30 th, Company 'A' had its platoons laying minefields in the Wadi Qued Zeroud. About noon, a tremendous explosion was heard and a great pillar of smoke mushroomed into the sky. It sounded like a mine, but appeared to be too far away. Some time later, we learned the terrible truth. One of our trucks with a load of 450 mines had blown up and an entire squad of 12 men from Company A were lost. The members of the squad were Sergeant Wayne K. Satre, Corporal Robert L. Christensen, T/5 Roger S. Loesch, Pvt. First Class Leland R. Ortmayer, all South Dakotans and Cleo W. LaFave, Walter Moore, Willard Bean, James J. O'Neil, Michael W. Marchison, William R. Stanton, Joseph R. Thomas and John C. Yoworski who had been assigned later from other states. The cause of the explosion is unknown but it is known that the truck was standing still and that the neutralized mines were being unloaded."

Company A's indoctrination to war continued, literally, "under fire." They often worked on roads to water points at the front while being shelled and strafed by enemy forces.

Nonetheless, by September 1943, the war in North Africa was, for the most part, over and Allied sights were then set on Europe. The Morning Report from September 21, when part of the 109th landed on a beach south of Salerno, Italy read, "Some ack-ack, Stragglers, Mosquitoes, Exploding mines on beach, Artillery fire in the distance." Company A arrived in Europe the next day.

Rain, mud, blown bridges, craters in roads, and mines slowed the advance of the 34th Division but they kept slogging forward. Company A was the only engineer unit attached to the forward elements during this first push into Italy. Near Castel Campagnano, they constructed a ferry for the 135th Infantry Combat Team to cross the Volturno before returning to the business of clearing mines, repairing roads, and bypassing blown bridges. Company A also built small runways for use by small, Cub-type, artillery observation planes. Dennis Sullivan of Company A was wounded during these operations in the fall of 1943. By this point, there had been so many transfers that in the company now numbering about 200, only 28 of the original members were still part of Company A.

All of the 109th 's companies were unusually busy during January, 1944. Company A built a forward Observation Post for the Division as well as another landing field. Other duties included hauling rock, building turn-arounds, and building and maintaining roads. Company A remained in the thick of things through Monte Cassino and Anzio.

April 16, 1945 marked the 500th day of combat for the 34th Division. It had been a year and a half of combat, interspersed with frequent breaks. Company A continued its sometimes tedious, often dangerous, arduous tour of duty. There were more mines to clear and lay, more rock to haul, more roads and bridges to build.

Company A's Virgil O. Johnson, of Ramona, who had been transferred to Company B, was killed by "friendly" small-arms fire on April 22, 1944 while laying mines at Isola Bella, near Anzio. T-5 George W. Haley of Rutland, who had served since 1941, was killed in action when he drove over a land mine in northern Italy on October 5, 1944.

Company A, as a unit, served in North Africa and Italy but since many had been transferred to other units, many original members served in the other sectors of the European Theater and also in the Pacific. Eugene Demick of Madison, who had left with Company A in 1941, served with the Rangers in Africa and Italy before being sent to the Pacific and preferred European fighting to Asiatic. He said the Japanese are not as good as soldiers as the Germans but they had a last ditch fanaticism that the Germans didn't. Add that to the jungle conditions, and it is easy to understand Demick's preference.

Of the 97 members listed on the roster of Company A in 1941, two (Royal Lee and Robert J. Hockett) became prisoners of war. One (James G. Pardy, Jr.) was killed in a motorcycle accident in Ireland. Eight were killed in action: Harley D. Beck (Anzio), Robert L. Christensen (near Anzio), John Farrell (Italy), Harlan Graff (Italy). Virgil O. Johnson (Isola Bella), Roger S. Loesch (Hajeb-el-Aouin), Leland R. Ortmayer (Hajeb-el-Aouin), and Veloris E. Waters (near Leghorn, Italy).

Company members also garnered many promotions and honors, a few of which are listed here. U.S. Bond was awarded both the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. The Croix de Guerre was awarded to Harold D. Kinsley. Raymond F. Ellison and Daniel S. Harding received the Soldier's Medal. A Bronze Star was awarded to Stuart N. Bradbury.

May we remember Company A of the 109th as Joe Koller, a newspaperman at the time, hoped in one of his columns written during the war.

"Peace will come again. Gallantry will not be forgotten. But in South Dakota national guard tradition the civilian defenders of the old frontier, the Fighting First, The Fourth South Dakota, the 147th and the 109th of today, and all the other outfits of state sponsored origin will never be forgotten."

Company A, 109th Engineer Regiment

Company A was placed at Madison, South Dakota. Previously, Madison had had a spasmodic record including four units, none of which became Previously, Madison had had a spasmodic record including four units, none of which became permanent (continuous) organizations until Company E, 4th South Dakota Infantry was formed in early 1917, later becoming part of the 116 th Supply Train in World War I.

Type of Separation Time of Separation
Transfers   At home station 1
To 132nd Regt 2 Camp Claiborne 24
To 34th Div. 2 Fort Dix 2
Within Regt. 3 North Ireland 19
Transfers out 19 North Africa 9
Prisoner 1 Italy before Cassino 7
End of Term 1 Cassino to Florence 6
To O.C.S. 14 Florence to Bologna 6
To hospital 4 After Bologna 23
Account depend. 2 Total 97
Physical disability 6
Overage 5
Reclassified 5
Killed in action with unit 5
Died accident 1
Rotation or points 17
With unit until deactivated 10
Total 97

Eight men out of the unit were killed, five with the unit, three after transfer. One died of an accident. Twelve men were wounded, nine with the unit, three after transfer. Two were prisoners of war. Two men received the Bronze Star, one the air medal, one the Distinguished Flying Cross, one the Croix de Guerre, two Soldier's Medals.

Company A, 109th Engineer Regiment

Home Station: Madison, South Dakota

Membership of the unit at time entered federal service in February, 1941: officers,3; enlisted men, 94. Roster is from the report of the Adjutant General, South Dakota for period July 1, 1940 to June 30, 1942. There is some incompleteness in the final record. This unit becomes Co. A of the 109th Eng.(Combat) Battalion and until there is an entry indicating a different situation the men continued as members of this unit.

CAPTAIN:

1. Newcomb, Parker - Transferred at Ft. Dix to 132nd Eng. Regt. And then to the 242nd Eng. Bn. as Commanding Officer. Was hospitalized in Guam and later discharged account physical disability as Lieutenant Colonel.

1st LIEUTENANT:

2. Lund, Raymond E. - Was transferred to Staff, G-2, section of the 34th Div. and served with that unit until August, 1944 when returned to the U.S. Later sent to the 9th Corps and served in Philippines and Japan. Bronze Star for service in North Africa and Italy. Discharged as a Lieutenant Colonel.

2nd LIEUTENANT:

3. Lee, Royal I. - Captured near Kasserine Pass, North Africa in February, 1943 and held prisoner until October 8, 1945. Discharged as a Captain.

1st SERGEANT:

4. Erickson, Leonard A. - Sent to O.C.S. from Northern Ireland. Commissioned and served with the Amphibious Engineers in the S.W. Pacific. 1st Lieutenant.

STAFF SERGEANTS:

5. Beck, Leslie K. - Discharged at Camp Claibourne account dependents fall of 1941. Recalled to service in 1942 and assigned to a Heavy Pontoon unit. Discharged as a 1st Sergeant.
6. Koehne, Kenneth - Transferred to the 132nd Eng. Regt. and later to 242nd Eng. (C) Bn. and served with that unit through campaign in Pacific. Returned to the U.S. from Kure, Japan late in 1945 as a Warrant Officer, Junior Grade.
7. Prohel, William H. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland. Commissioned and saw service in the S.W. Pacific. Discharged as a Captain.

SERGEANTS:

8. Bond, Urban S. - Sent to O.C.S. from Fort Claibourne in 1941. Commissioned in the Air Corps. Receiver the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. Was in Transport section in North Africa, Italy, and India. Discharged as a Captain.
9. Ellison, Raymond F. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation from vicinity of Florence, Italy in 1944 and later assigned to Cooks and Bakers School at Camp Claibourne. Staff Sergeant. Soldier's Medal.
10. Graves, Joe W. - Returned to the U.S. about January, 1944 and later assigned to the 242nd Eng. (C) Bn. and saw service in the Pacific. Staff Sergeant.
11. Hanson, Kermit T. - Sent to O.C.S. at Camp Claibourne and commissioned in Air Corps, served in Transport Command in North Africa and India. Captain.
12. Huth, Stanley J. - Sent to O.C.S. at Camp Calibourne and commissioned.
13. Lowry, John W. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland. Commissioned and served with the 911th and 1687th (C) Bn. in Europe. 1st Lieutenant.
14. Natwick, Milo E. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland. Commissioned and became a demolition instructor at Fort Belvoir. Captain.
15. Siep, Harlow J. - Continued with unit until transferred to 85th Division for return to the U.S. in 1945.

CORPORALS:

16. Brown, Arnold W. - Wounded in May, 1944 and later discharged account Physical Disability. Sergeant.
17. Demick, Ernest A. - Discharged as overage at Camp Claibourne fall of 1941 and later recalled to service with the 1398th Construction Eng. And to S.W. pacific.
18. Ellis, Robert L. - Returned to U.S. on Temp. Duty from Italy and returned and transferred to the 85th Div. after hostilities ceased for return to the U.S.
19. Hansen, Stanley G. - Returned to the U.S. on points in June, 1945 as 1st Sergeant.
20. Hanson, Byron, C. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland. Commissioned. Served with 233rd Eng. (C) Bn. in Guam, Leyte, Kerama Retto, and Ryukus. 1st Lieutenant.
21. Pauley, Joe M,--Transferred to headquarters Co. and served with unit until end of hostilities in Italy. Sergeant.
22. Schultz, Bertrand - Reclassified and transferred to QM Bn. in Italy in fall of 1943.
23. Unterbrunner, Robert M. - Transferred to headquarters Co. and returned to U.S. on temporary duty from Italy and later returned and transferred to 85th Div. for return to U.S. after hostilities ceased as 1st Sergeant.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS:

24. Barger, Josiah H. - Discharged account of physical disability at Camp Claibourne.
25. Christensen, Robert L. - Killed in action in May, 1944 near Anzio.
26. Hackett, Everett T. - Reclassified and transferred to an Military Police unit at about time unit was in vicinity of Venefro, Italy.
27. Hopisington, Roy F. - Discharged account of physical disability at Camp Claibourne.
28. Hillister, Richard - Discharged account physical disability in Italy. 1st Sergeant.
29. Hosuka, Chesley R. - Transferred to a Quartermaster Truck unit in Italy. Corporal.
30. Jackson, Vernon A.R. - Continued with unit till end of hostilities in Italy. Corporal.
31. Kinsley, Harold D. - Transferred to the 3rd Div. in North Africa. Awarded the Croix de Guerre. Corporal.
32. Leighton, Charles F. - Transferred to the 3rd Division in North Ireland.
33. Sullivan, Robert T. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation from North Italy.
34. Van Hove, Arnold - Returned to the U.S. on points from the vicinity of Racconigi, Italy in Jun, 1945. T/5.
35. Wagner, Theodore F. - Sent to West Point military Academy from Camp Claibourne. Graduated in 1945.

PRIVATES:

36. Barstad, Leonard T. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland. Commissioned and served with an Engineer Combat Bn. in European Theatre. Lieutenant.
37. Beck, Harley D. - Transferred to the 3rd Infantry Division and later killed in action at Anzio.
38. Bettmeng, Lawrence J. - Returned to the U.S. from Italy in May, 1945. PFC.
39. Chalberg, Robert D. - Sent to O.C.S. from north Ireland and commissioned in the Engineers.
40. Corey, Charles E. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation from the vicinity of Bologna, Italy. PFC.
41. Dahl, Carl M. - Transferred to Company E,
42. Demick, Eugene L. - Transferred to the 1st Ranger Battalion in North Ireland. Wounded at Salerno, Sept., 1943, and returned to the U.S. and sent to O.C.S., commissioned and saw service in the Pacific. Lieutenant.
43. Ellis, Donald R. - Reclassified in Italy in fall of 1943 and transferred out of unit.
44. Fisher, Donan K. - Transferred to the 5th Engineers at Camp Claibourne and withthat unit to Iceland.
45. Gile, Dene W,--Wounded at Venefro, Italy and returned to the U.S. and stationed at Fort Belvoir.
46. Graff, Harlan L. - Transferred to the 3rd Infantry Division in North Africa and killed in action in Italy.
47. Gray, Buford A. - Wounded on the winter line south of Bologna, Italy and returned to the U.S. from the vicinity of Turin on rotation.
48. Harding, Daniel S. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation in Sept., 1944 as staff sergeant. Soldier's Medal.
49. Harr, Gerald J. - Transferred to the 1st Ranger Battalion in North Ireland. Wounded in raid at Seneb, Tunisia. Returned to U.S. on rotation in Nov., 1944.
50. Hartung, Cecil H. - Transferred to O.C.S. in North Ireland and retained at Ft. Belvoir as an instructor for the balance of the war. Captain.
51. Haug, Lyle H. - Wounded at Cassoretta, Italy in April, 1944 and discharged account of physical disability in January, 1945. Staff Sergeant.
52. Hackett, Robert J. - Transferred to the 6th Commandos and taken a prisoner in North Africa in 1942. Escaped in Italy and recaptured.
53. Holman, Clarence - Discharged as overage at Camp Claibourne fall of 1941 and later recalled to service and discharged as a Staff Sergeant. Ran messes in the U.S.
54. Kern, Ardon S. - Wounded on Christmas Day, 1944. Returned to the U.S. on Temp. Duty and later returned to Italy where transferred to the 85th Div. for return to the U.S. after hostilities ceased. T/5.
55. Loesch, Roger S. - Killed in action near Hajeb el Aouin, North Africa when truck load of soldiers were blown up.
56. McGrath, Robert J. - Transferred to 5th Engineers at Camp Claibourne and with that unit to Iceland.
57. Meyer, Kenneth J. - Transferred to Hq. 34th Div., in Italy and returned to the U.S. on rotation in June, 1945. T/5.
58. Olson, Donald L. - Discharged account of physical disability at Camp Claibourne.
59. Pardy, James G., Jr. - Accidentally killed in a motorcycle accident in North Ireland.
60. Richardson, Ralph R. - Returned to the U.S. on points or rotation in June 1945. T/5.
61. Roche, Walter F. - Reclassified and sent to another unit at mateur, North Africa, June, 1943. T/4.
62. Roche, William S. - Transferred to the 112th Eng. Bn. and later to the 291st Eng. (C) Bn. and served in Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland, and Central Europe. Returned to the U.S. on points in the fall of 1945.
63. Rohweder, Lyle M. - Transferred to the hospital in North Ireland and not returned to the unit.
64. Sage, Lyle P. - Reclassified while on the winter line in North Italy in 1944-45 and later discharged for physical disability.
65. Slagel, Gerald D. - Returned to the U.S. on points or rotation in June, 1945 from Italy. T/5.
66. Spellman, Earl R. - Seriously injured at Camp Claibourne in an accident with a pneumatic saw and discharged on account of physical disability.
67. Sullivan, Dennis M. - Wounded in Italy, Nov., 1943. Later returned early in 1945 on Temp. Duty to the U.S. and returned to unit and transferred to 85th Div. for return to the U.S. after hostilities ceased. Staff Sergeant.
68. Sweeney, George L. - Discharged on account of end of term of service while at Home Station.
69. Vincent, Ralph L. - Sent to O.C.S. from Camp Claibourne. Commissioned in Air Corps.
70. Waters, Veloris E. - Killed in action near Leghorn, Italy, July, 1944.
71. Webberhurst, George V. - Returned to U.S. on points or rotation from Italy in June, 1945. T/4.
72. Wheeler, Bruce W. - Sent to O.C.S. from Camp Claibourne. Commissioned in Air Corps.
73. Arnold, Stuart C. - Discharged as overage at Camp Claibourne; later called into service and saw service in the Pacific. Staff Sergeant.
74. Bradbury, Stuart N. - Bronze Star, heroic achievement in action, Italy. Returned to the U.S. after deactivation of unit in July, 1945. T/5.
75. Brandt, Harlan P. - Returned to the U.S. on points from Italy, June, 1945.
76. Birch, Richard C. - Wounded at Anzio. Returned to the U.S. in Aug., 1945 from Italy as a Sergeant.
77. Clark, John A. - Discharged account of overage at Camp Claibourne fall of 1941.
78. Farrell, John J. - Transferred to a Military Police Bn. at Camp Claibourne and was later killed in action in Italy.
79. Fergen, Thomas B. - Wounded in Italy at Laggio. Transferred to the 1st Ranger Bn. in North Ireland. Discharged account of physical disability.
80. Gulbrandson, Herman T. - Discharged account overage at Camp Claibourne fall of 1941.
81. Halgerson, Delmar E. - Transferred to a Military Police Bn. at Camp Claibourne.
82. Hicks, Richard H. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation from North Italy.
83. Holtslander, Marion E. - Transferred to the hospital in North Africa and later dis-charged account of physical disability.
84. Holvick, Arno M. - Returned to the U.S. on rotation, April, 1945. T/5.
85. Huntimer, Harold W. - Discharged at Camp Claibourne, fall of 1941 account dependents.
86. Hytholt, Dale M. - Wounded at Venfro, Italy, January, 1944 and returned to the U.S. on rotation in December, 1944. T/5.
87. Johnson, Virgil O. - Transferred to Co. B, 109th Eng. Bn. He was killed from small arms fire from own Infantry while laying mines near Isola Della in Anzio Beachhead.
88. Loudenberg, Harvey A. - Returned to U.S. with 85th Div. after all hostilities had ceased in Italy. T/5.
89. Maley, Byrum M. - Returned to the U.S. with 85th Div. after all hostilities ceased in Italy. T/5.
90. Mos, Arvid O. - Transferred to hospital in North Africa as the result of an accident and not returned to unit.
91. Norjor, Orlo J. - Transferred to Military Police Bn. at Camp Claibourne.
92. Ortmayer, Leland R. - Killed in action when a truck load of soldiers were blown up in a mine explosion near Hajeb el Aouin, North Africa.
93. Sorenson, Melvin M. - Transferrred to Co. E, 109th Eng. Bn. and then to the 6th Commandos in North Ireland.
94. Vickmark, Clayton O. - Transferred to the 1st Ranger Bn. in North Ireland. Served in North Africa, landings at Gela, Sicily, and Salerno, Italy. Returned to the U.S. in August, 1941. Physical disability.
95. Walter, Lawrence J. - Returned to the U.S. on transfer to the 85th Div. after all hos-tilities over in Italy. T/5.
96. Williams, Frank E. - Returned from Italy on points in July, 1945. PFC.
97. Wright, Douglas G. - Sent to O.C.S. from North Ireland.

Lake County Women in World War II

WAC, WAVE, and SPAR are acronyms that are a footnote in the history of the "greatest generation."

Approximately 400,000 girls next door presented themselves for active service with the Armed Forces of the United States during World War II.

They came from every state and social class with one common goal, to serve. Ask one of them what SPAR stands for and she will tell you in no uncertain terms.

The women of Lake County who served on active duty during World War II and the four women who served overseas with them as American Red Cross "Doughnut Dollies" are listed below.

This old soldier says to you, "May God bless each of you for your service then and for the trail you blazed for the women who serve today and may we never forget you."

Name (* denotes service overseas) Town Rank
Ashenbrucher, Antonnette A. Madison Master Sergeant
Baumeister, Thelma Madison Engineer
Benedict, Gayle M. Madison Shopkeeper First Class
Blagen, Helen L. Madison Ensign
Boriff, Dorothy Ramona Navy
Buehler, Lois* Madison Army Nurse
Carmody, Dorothy M. Ramona Private First Class
Closner, Jean A. Madison Seaman 2nd Class
Dyce, Genevieve M. Madison Unknown
Eiekmeier, Florence Madison 1st Lt. (Nurse Corps)
Gauthun, Elaine M. Nunda Ships Cook
Harrington, Emma Madison Mess Sgt. (AAC)
Healey, Mary J. Madison Private
Hess, Doris M. Madison Yeoman 2nd Class
Hexom, Erla M. Madison Petty Officer 2nd Class
Hilde, Eva S. * Madison Technical Sergeant
Hills, Marion K. Madison Yeoman 2nd Class
Holvich, Dorothy J. * Madison Second Lieutenant
Jones, Deloris H. Madison PharmacistMate 2nd Class
Katchel, Marian K. Madison Yeoman 3rd Class
Lind, Jennie Mae Madison Machinist Mate 3rdClass
Mallwitz, Mildred L. * Junius 1st Lt. (Nurse Corps)
Martin, Helen C. Madison Sergeant
Miller, Geraldine B. * Ramona First Lieutenant
Mueller, Darlene M. Madison Second Lieutenant
Ney, Phillis L. Madison Yeoman 1st Class
Nichols, Virginia D. * Ramona Second Lieutenant
Overskei, Mildred G. * Nunda Captain
Pavlov, Marcia Madison Second Lieutenant
Rensch, Dorothy Ramona Machinist Mate 2nd Class
Rensch, June Ramona Machinist Mate 2nd Class
Russel, Marjorie B. Madison. Technician 4 th Class
Ryan, Agnes * Madison Staff Sergeant
Schrader, Erva Madison Yeoman 2nd Class
Smit, Margarette * Madison Corporal
Stoneback, Lavonna Madison Corporal
Sullivan, Patricia Madison PharmacistMate 1st Class
Sundberg, Evelyne R. Madison Shopkeeper 2nd Class
Terwilliger, Thelma I. Madison Sergeant
Thode, Vernette Wentworth Second lieutenant
Wagner, Lavon A. * Rutland First Lieutenant
Walter, Louise F. Lake Co. Corporal

 

AMERICAN RED CROSS OVERSEAS
Aga, Charlotte 19 mos., Hospital Service ETO
O'Connell, Camilla 19 mos., Camp and Club Service ETO
Sharp, Ethel. K. Carlson 24 mos., Volunteer, Club Service ETO
Westaby, Carol E. 16 mos., Camp and Club Service ETO

(Thanks to Joe Thompson and his book South Dakota in World War II, compiled by the state's World War II History Commission for this list.)

LAKE COUNTY'S
FALLEN SONS OF WORLD WAR II
Adolfson, Wesley C.M. Lowry, Robert C.
Baughman, Daniel S., Jr. Malone, Richard
Beck, Harley D. Manthey, Cyril J.
Blase, Woodrow R. Marsh, Herbert J.
Bondurant, Don Mathison, Milo W.
Bruns, Dwayne F. McGillivray, Harold
Croisant, Henry G. Miller, Roger A.
DeRungs, Jacob A. Moran, Walter J.
DeRungs, John C. Mosher, Robert A.
Faiferlick, Walter M. Nelson, Orlando
Farrell, John J. Norton, Clayton C.
Ferguson, Joseph R. Overskei, Harold
Fisher, John D. Palli. Bernard
Gardner, Richard Pardy, Jack G.
Graff, Garry H. Pardy, James G., Jr.
Graff, Harlan J. Parker, Smith O.
Griffith, Glen G. Potas, Henry O.
Gross, Emerson R. Price, Clifford
Grytness, Charles E. Rempel, Lowell D.
Haley, George W. Rensch, Richard J
Harms, Emil J. Roesch, Harold W.
Hoiland, George Ronk, John, Jr.
Holt, Lester H. Smith, Thomas R.
Horn, Albert C. Stensland, Joseph O.
Hutchinson, William Timmons, Edmund W.
Jeffers, Earle D. Toebbe, Henry E.
Johnson, Virgil O. Tyler, Donald
Ketcham, Edward W. Waters,Veloris
Kirstein, Arnold H. Welch, Willis, J.
Lee, Donald G. Williams, William V.